CIOS Archive

The CIOS has an extensive archive of original items from the Occupation period including maps, plans, documents, film and photographs. These are available to fellow researchers by request, for further information please contact us. Below is a small sample of photographs taken during the occupation of the Channel Islands.

CIOS Photograph Archive

Photo 1

An interesting photo taken on 2 July 1940 the first day most locals would have seen German troops patrolling the Island.

The three soldiers on the left of the photo are a machine gun team heading for Castle Cornet built before 1204 which guards the entrance to St. Peter Port harbour. Police Constable Fred Short on his B.S.A. Motorcycle had been tasked with escorting the two Luftwaffe Pilot Officers around the island.

Note the list of locations held by the officer with the walking stick and the Orders of the Commandants of the German Forces in Occupation of the Bailiwick of Guernsey signed by Major Lanz can be seen in the other officers hand which is the reason for the tour to distribute these orders and fix them in prominent position

Credit:- CIOS

Photo 1

Two Luftwaffe pilots ask a Police Motorcyclist for directions on the Castle Emplacement, St. Peter Port, Guernsey.

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Photo 2

This photo comes from a small set taken in those first few days in Sark, the building behind was their first billet and was the Hotel Bel Air, now the site of the HSBC bank.

The hotel burnt down on 26 January 1942 after the makeshift addition to the heating was made to the hotel and a pot-belled stove chimney was pushed through the thatched roof with the heat drying and then setting fire to the thatch, helped by a strong breeze the whole building was destroyed.

Credit:- CIOS

Photo 2

A photo taken on 4th July 1940 the first section of German Soldiers to occupy the Island of Sark.

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Photo 3

At first you notice the lone German soldier on the lower roof and the machine-gun position with it's flap dropped in the blocked up doorway below the Hotel sign.

However the hotel also housed the control panel wired to the explosives laid around the harbour which was to be detonated if the main port was attempted to be captured.

The hotel's main defence came from the Czech 4.7 cm anti-tank gun with it's coaxial mounted Besa machine-gun house in the bunker gun room which was constructed on the ground floor of the main bar to cover the crossroad.

The shadow around the recessed armour plate hiding the gun can be seen.

Credit:- CIOS

Photo 3

The White-Hart Hotel, St. Peter Port, Guernsey overlooking the main crossroads was a perfect position for defence.

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Photo 4

Hafenkommondant der Kanalinseln meaning Harbour Commander of the Channel Islands can be seen written on the doors to the left of the main door.

That role commenced in Jersey in July 1940 by KorvettenKapitan Freiher Von Nostitz he held the equivalent rank of Flag Officer in the Royal Navy and remained in post at the Pomme D'Or until 16 September 1941 when the command structure was split by appointing a separate Hafenkommondant (Hako) for both Guernsey and Jersey and Alderney followed suit in February 1942.

Hotels were a popular choice for the Germans the communal dining rooms and catering facilities as well as large numbers of rooms made ideal billets. Obviously with the close proximity to the harbour and by two main road junctions this was an obvious choice for the HQ for the Navy in Jersey.

Credit:- CIOS

Photo 4

The Pomme D'Or Hotel, St Helier, Jersey was taken over by the Germans as the Navy Headquaters.

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Photo 5

As the war was to progress less and less was available and after the Normandy invasions of June 1944 the later part of the year found the Island completely cut off from supplies and only what could be grown or made locally was to feed both the locals and the occupying force and as the winter of 1944 set in so did starvation.

Credit:- CIOS

Photo 5

A common site during the war, here we see a long cue of customers in Le Pollet waiting for rations.

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Photo 6

This building became the administration HQ building for the Feldkommondantur 515, the German Civilian administration.

This photo taken on 1 May 1941 belonged to the man by the door with the glasses third from the left who is Hans Herzog the Sonderfuhrer for Alderney he is seen with members from the Feldkommondantur 515 Guernsey and Jersey, which were based at the Grange Lodge, Guernsey and Victoria College, Jersey.

Also there was second from the left, Oberst Schumacher and fourth from the left peeping through the gap is Dr. Kratzer.

Credit:- Heinz Herzog via Alderney Museum

Photo 6

German army Officers and NCO's stand outside the Lloyd's Bank, 35 Victoria Street, Alderney.

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Photo 7

Design of the Char B dates back to 1926 when three prototypes were built by a consortium of companies under the control of Atelier de Construction de Rueil. Subsequent developments saw the appearance of the Char B1 in 1935 and the Char B1 bis, an up-armoured version, about a year later.

Although classed as a medium tank the Char B was clearly designed for infantry support. Its main armament, a 75mm howitzer, is located in the hull, alongside the driver who aims and fires it. The tank commander, in the turret, has to load and fire the 47mm gun and the 7.5mm machine-gun.

In its day the Char B was regarded as one of the most powerful tanks in the world, yet still had many features which harked back to the First World War; the tall hull, all-round tracks and side entry doors, for example. On the mechanical side, however, it was extremely sophisticated.

The Renault 6 cylinder engine had been modified from an aircraft unit while the transmission was operated by a Naeder hydrostatic system which gave the driver superb control when swinging the tank to aim the gun. The Char B was also equipped with an advanced gyroscopic direction indicator.

The Char B was issued to tank battalions in armoured divisions and saw extensive combat in the summer of 1940. There is some evidence to suggest that visibility from the tank was poor and, undoubtedly, the crew of four was over stretched.

Credit:- CIOS

Photo 7

French Char bis B1 tanks lined up after Liberation in Circus Field at Millbrook, Jersey. These were to become valuable scrap metal.

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Photo 8

The first contingent of 21 Royal Artillerymen and with Nobby Hamon of the Royal Hampshire under the command of Captain R. H. Hill, this small party was known as the Omelette Party of Operation Nestegg and they arrived in the German Hafenschutz boat FK04 at the inner west berth of the new jetty.

To greet this first party were the local constabulary in the shape of Chief officer Inspector Bert Lamy, Acting Deputy Inspector Banneville and Sergeant's Plevin and Bull, as the boat got close by Nobby shouted 'Hello, Sergeant Bull'

Credit:- CIOS

Photo 8

Liberation in Guernsey 9th May 1945, shown here is well known local footballer “Nobby” Hamon arriving as part of the British Task Force 135.

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Photo 9

The photo taken by Charles Brown of the RAF and shows some of the first troops to leave Alderney after Liberation. The large building in the background is the stone crusher from Alderney's pre-war quarry days and has long since been removed.

Each soldier was allowed one suitcase and one holdall, initially the troops have been deloused before marching to the harbour, their trip took them to Southampton.

The Prisoners of War would be graded as to their political standing at one of three holding camps in England, here they would be interrogated on military matters and a good idea could be gained of the prisoners loyalty to the Nazi regime.

They would be graded by a colour patch which was worn on their uniform. A white patch meant the person in question had no particular loyalty and was indifferent to National Socialism. A grey patch meant that the prisoner, although not an ardent Nazi, had no strong feelings either way wore a grey patch.

The confirmed Nazis wore a black patch. After interrogation they would be sent on to one of nearly 400 graded camps in England, Wales or Scotland and set to work in the post war clear up and then into factory or agricultural work with most staying on until 1948.

Credit:- Charles Brown

Photo 9

Photo taken by Charles Brown showing some of the first German troops leaving Alderney in May of 1945 for several years as Pow's in Britain.

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